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    100 Years Ago Today - March 8, 1913

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    Geo Beats

    by Geo Beats

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    Here are 5 news stories from around the world 100 years ago.

    What was happening in the world one hundred years ago? Hi this is Matt and here are 5 New York Times headlines from March 8th, 1913.

    Number 5 - Lower wages for women was a big issue at that time and a large gathering representing various facets of society gathered to discuss the situation. One question asked by the audience seemed to resonate the most among those gathered - "If a girl were receiving $8 a week, and had to support a widowed mother, would you blame that girl if she committed a crime?"

    Number 4 - French royalty tried to sneak in a pet pig into an upscale hotel in New York and that stirred some drama. A watchman discovered the pig in the hotel room - he found a wild South American pig, described by him as a foot and a half long and covered with bushy brownish hair, having the time of his life in the bedroom. He was captured after a lively game of pig-in-the-corner. And he ended up staying in a separate hotel area.

    Number 3 - When advertising today, your travel companies would list wifi, leather seating, flat screen tv to make you comfortable. In 1913, Pennsylvania railroad wanted you to travel in comfort. And this is how they convinced you - 'The railroad is rock-ballasted and evenly graded; and the rails are solid steel. The cars, both Pullmans and coaches, are all-steel, heavy
    and easy riding.'

    Number 2 - In a bizarre case of apartment fire, two mothers ended jumping with their babies to escape. The first one - jumped to the yard below from the second floor. The second one blindly threw the baby from the 2nd floor. The falling child stuck a little boy but was unhurt.

    Number 1 - New York City was considering lowering cab fares - possibly bringing it down from 60 cents per first mile to 40 cents first mile. In comparison, today, just the initial fare is $2.50 and then fifty cents for each additional one fifth of a mile.