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4 months ago

Experimental COVID Treatment Derived From Llamas Shows Promise

Wibbitz Top Stories
Wibbitz Top Stories
Experimental COVID Treatment, Derived From Llamas, Shows Promise.
According to the BBC, early trials of a COVID-19 therapy derived from a llama named Fifi has shown, "significant potential.".
The experimental research was done at
the Rosalind Franklin Institute in Oxfordshire, England.
The experimental research was done at
the Rosalind Franklin Institute in Oxfordshire, England.
The team's work has shown
that coronavirus-infected
rodents treated with a
new nanobody nasal spray
fully recovered within six days.
The BBC points out that the treatment
has only been tested in lab animals.
but Public Health England said it was among the, "most effective SARS-CoV-2
neutralizing agents" tested to date.
Similar to antibodies, virus-specific nanobodies bind to viruses and bacteria and help the body's immune system target them for destruction.
By vaccinating Fifi with a tiny, non-infectious piece
of the viral protein, the scientists stimulated her
immune system to make the special molecules.
Professor Naismith and his collaborators agreed that
even with the success of COVID-19 vaccines, having
effective treatments in the future would be crucial.
Professor Naismith and his collaborators agreed that
even with the success of COVID-19 vaccines, having
effective treatments in the future would be crucial.
The study was published in
the journal 'Nature Communications.' .
But according to the BBC, Professor Sheena Cruickshank,
an immunologist from the University of Manchester,
said the new development was, "exciting but still quite early.".
We need more data on efficacy and safety
before we move to human trials.
However it's very promising nonetheless
and the fact it may be cheaper and easier
to administer is a plus. Covid-19 will be,
unfortunately, with us for a while yet,
so more treatments will be needed, Professor Sheena Cruickshank, Immunologist from
the University of Manchester, via BBC.
We need more data on efficacy and safety
before we move to human trials.
However it's very promising nonetheless
and the fact it may be cheaper and easier
to administer is a plus. Covid-19 will be,
unfortunately, with us for a while yet,
so more treatments will be needed, Professor Sheena Cruickshank, Immunologist from
the University of Manchester, via BBC

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