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“It’s really amazing, and kind of a throwback to nature,” Relihan said, “because if you think about a foal being born in the wild,

RisingHealth
2 years ago|1 view
“It’s really amazing, and kind of a throwback to nature,” Relihan said, “because if you think about a foal being born in the wild,
they have to be up running with the herd within the first several hours, because otherwise they are at risk for predators.”
After about a week, the mare and foal are paired with another mare
and foal about the same age in a slightly larger paddock, so the babies can socialize.
First, It’s Baby Steps for American Pharoah’s Progeny -
By MELISSA HOPPERTMAY 5, 2017
LEXINGTON, Ky. — A feeling of hope rippled across bluegrass country,
and everywhere else in the world of racing, when at 12:30 a.m. on Jan. 3 a mare named Kakadu gave birth to the very first foal by the Triple Crown winner American Pharoah.
And I hate to say it, it’s extremely selfish, but I kind of hope there’s not another Triple Crown winner for a little while,
because every time another horse fails it just shows how special American Pharoah is.”
A version of this article appears in print on May 6, 2017, on Page D1 of the New York edition with the headline: First, It’s Baby Steps.
Kakadu delivered the foal three weeks early at Brookdale Farm in Versailles, Ky.,
beating Untouched Talent, who was also in foal to American Pharoah, by 12 days.
After 30 days, the mare is then likely to be bred back (Kakadu is now in foal to Empire Maker, American Pharoah’s grandsire),
and the foal gets its first taste of separation from his mother.