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7 years ago|177 views

Chilean Devil Rays Found To Be Among Ocean’s Deepest Divers

Geo Beats
Geo Beats
Chilean Devil Rays, once thought to be exclusively surface dwellers, have been found to be one of the deepest diving creatures in the ocean.

Chilean Devil Rays, once thought to be exclusively surface dwellers, have been found to be one of the deepest diving creatures in the ocean.

They can plunge up to a mile downward, and often do. How long they stay in the deep depends upon how far they’ve gone.

Plunges to maximum depths typically last for between 60 and 90 minutes and are only taken once a day.

Shorter dives, those up to about 3 thousand feet, result in significantly longer stays of up to 11 hours in duration.

Scientists discovered this by reviewing the data transmitted by a number of tagged rays.

A group of them were outfitted with sensors in 2011 and 2012 that both tracked their activity and took readings of their environments, including water temperature and amount of available light.

The researchers were quite shocked by what they found, but one previous study did offer clues that it was a possibility.

In the 1970s it was discovered that Chilean Devils Rays had a natural temperature modulating system.

At the time it is was believed to be used for cooling purposes, but the new diving discovery shows it’s likely for the opposite.