Roberta Dudley - When You're Alone

kspm0220s

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Unfortunately, I found no information at all about this strong blues singer. She recorded only one disc in 1922. She was accompanied by Ory's Sunshine Orchestra. Edward "Kid" Ory (1886-1973) was a famous jazz trombonist and bandleader, who started playing music with home-made instruments in his childhood, and by his teens was leading a well-regarded band in Southeast Louisiana. Ory was a banjo player during his youth and it is said that his ability to play the banjo helped him develop "tailgate", a particular style of playing the trombone. In "tailgate" style the trombone plays a rhythmic line underneath the trumpets and cornets. In 1919 Ory moved to Los Angeles and he recorded there in 1921 with a band that included Mutt Carey, clarinetist and pianist Dink Johnson, and string bassist Ed Garland. Garland and Carey were longtime associates who would still be playing with Ory during his 1940s comeback. While in Los Angeles Ory and his band recorded two songs, "Ory's Creole Trombone" and "Society Blues." They were the first jazz recordings made on the west coast by an African-American jazz band from New Orleans. His band recorded with the recording company Nordskog and Ory paid them for the pressings and then sold them under his own label of "Kid Ory's Sunshine Orchestra" at a store in Los Angeles called Spikes Brothers Music Store. In 1925, Ory moved to Chicago, where he was very active, working and recording with Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, Joe "King" Oliver, Johnny Dodds, Bessie Smith, Ma Rainey, and many others. He mentored Benny Goodman, and later Charles Mingus. During the Great Depression Ory retired from music and would not play again until 1943. From 1944 to about 1961 he led one of the top New Orleans style bands of the period. In addition to Mutt Carey and Ed Garland, trumpeters Alvin Alcorn and Teddy Buckner; clarinetists Darnell Howard, Jimmie Noone, Albert Nicholas, Barney Bigard, and George Probert; pianists Buster Wilson, Cedric Haywood, and Don Ewell; and drummer Minor Hall were among his sidemen during this period. The Ory band was an important force in reviving interest in New Orleans jazz, making popular 1941-1942 radio broadcasts as well as by making recordings. During the late 1940s and early 1950s, Ory and his group appeared at the Beverly Cavern in Los Angeles. Ory retired from music in 1966 and spent his last years in Hawaii. I apologize for poor sound on this upload but I considered this rare interpretation too precious to discard.

4 commentaires

Thank you Ginny; this is quite impressive blues for sure.
Par kspm0220s l'année dernière
Thanks Jack! This blues singer was most remarkable indeed, and one can only guess why she only left two sides.
Par kspm0220s l'année dernière
Thank you for posting this marvelous blues recording!
Par Ginny Karyn (gigi129) l'année dernière
Excellent blues vocal. Too bad there are not more Roberta Dudley recordings available. Definitely has an authentic period NOLA feel to it.
Par Boston Blackie l'année dernière