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    "Red Pad" Tablet for Chinese Communist Party Officials Ridiculed

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    NTDTelevision

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    Chinese netizens are fuming over an iPad-like device being marketed to Communist officials. The so-called "Red Pad" is a high-powered tablet with an asking price that puts Apple's iPad to shame. The future of this flashy device may be bleak though, as the Chinese regime faces tough criticism from people tired of public funds being misused.

    A gadget tailored made for senior Chinese Communist officials is raising eyebrows online.

    Dubbed the "Red Pad No.1," this iPad-like device claims it can carry out the duties of Communist officials by staying connected with the online public and Communist Party communications. It comes with a hefty price tag though, at 9999 Yuan—or more than $1,500 US dollars—the Red Pad costs more than twice a comparable iPad.

    The high cost drew concern from netizens. Many already believe Communist officials misuse public funds through procurement programs or expensive and unnecessary goods and services.

    Responding to an article on the Red Pad, this netizen writes satirically, "Just buy what's expensive, not what's required. Our country is indeed very rich."

    Beijing-based author Mr. Li also questions whether this gadget is really what officials need for their jobs.

    [Mr. Li, Beijing Author]:
    "First, to tailor make a device for Party leaders...I think this is something that would only happen in China. Also, there are hundreds of millions of people on microblogs. If officials really cared about the public, they can easily find out about what they public is thinking online. Do they really need such a special administrative gadget?"

    With all the unwanted attention it's generated, the Red Pad and its maker Red Technology may be facing a backlash from its potential clients—senior Communist officials, who are eager to keep dissent in check.