J.C. Ryle - Expository Thoughts on the Gospels - St. Matthew 23:34-39 (75 of 96)

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J.C. Ryle - Expository Thoughts on St. Matthew Playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL82A791ACE16E695F J.C. Ryle - Expository Thoughts on the Gospels - St. Matthew 23:34-39 (75 of 96) "Expository Thoughts" divides the Gospels into sections of about twelve verses each, from which J. C. Ryle selects two or three prominent points to dwell on and bring to the reader's attention. In Ryle's day, there were many detailed commentaries and expositions on scripture. In writing these "Expository Thoughts", Ryle aimed to offer a resource to the laity for use in family prayers, as an aid to those who visit the sick and desire a proper book to read on such occasions, and for private devotions for those whose callings and engagements make it impossible for them to read large commentaries. Rev. Ryle offered this first volume on the Gospel of St. Matthew "with an earnest prayer, that it may tend to the promotion of pure and undefiled religion, help to extend the knowledge of Christ, and be a humble instrument in aid of the glorious work of converting and edifying immortal souls." J.C. Ryle playlist: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=F5502DD37912A9C7 J.C. Ryle - (1816-1900), first Anglican bishop of Liverpool John Charles Ryle was born at Macclesfield and was educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford. He was a fine athlete who rowed and played Cricket for Oxford, where he took a first class degree in Greats and was offered a college fellowship (teaching position) which he declined. The son of a wealthy banker, he was destined for a career in politics before answering a call to ordained ministry. He was spiritually awakened in 1838 while hearing Ephesians 2 read in church. He was ordained by Bishop Sumner at Winchester in 1842. After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas's, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880). In 1880, at age 64, he became the first bishop of Liverpool, at the recommendation of Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli. He retired in 1900 at age 83 and died later the same year. Ryle was a strong supporter of the evangelical school and a critic of Ritualism. Among his longer works are Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century (1869), Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (7 vols, 1856-69) and Principles for Churchmen (1884). 

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