US Congressional Commission on China Issues 2011 Annual Report

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The United States Congressional-Executive Committee on China has released its annual report, focusing on human rights and the rule of law in China. According to the report, not much has changed since the commission was created in 2001. US Congressman Chris Smith introduced the report.

On Wednesday, United States Congressman Chris Smith introduced the bipartisan annual report of the Congressional-Executive Commission on how human rights and the rule of law have been playing out in China.

[Chris Smith, US Congressman]:
"The 2011 report notes that China's leaders have actually tightened their grip on Chinese society, and grown more aggressive in disregarding the very laws and international standards that they claim to uphold."

The commission was created in 2001 and monitors human rights and the development of rule of law in China. Many of the human rights abuses carried out by the Chinese regime when the commission was created are still going on in 2011.

[Chris Smith, US Congressman]:
"The commission's 2011 report also documents ongoing abuses in the areas of religious freedom. Protestant house church members, under ground Catholics and Falun Gong members continue to risk detention and abuse for attempting to worship freely."

Chris Smith is chairman of the Congressional-Executive Committee on China and the Human Rights Sub-Committee. Smith is highly critical of the Chinese regime's human rights record.

[Chris Smith, US Congressman]:
"And as China adopts a new rhetorical strategy of claiming it abides by international law, we also hold China to it's stated acceptance of international norms."

The Commission is comprised of nine senators, nine representatives and five senior officials appointed by the US President. The report cites numerous political prisoners in China.

Ben Hedges

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