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    Hong Kong Protests Continue over Police Suppression During Li Keqiang Visit

    NTDTelevision

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    Hong Kong residents are still fuming over what they call suppressions of freedom during the visit of Chinese Communist Party official Li Keqiang last month. Since the visit, several protests against the police and the Hong Kong government have taken place, including one last weekend.

    Senior Communist party official Li Keqiang ended his visit to Hong Kong on August 18th. Three weeks later, and protests are still going on over heavy-handed police tactics, and suppression of freedom of speech during Li’s visit.

    Journalists took to the streets to protest suppression of the press. Professors have spoken out, and now students are calling on Hong Kong’s police commissioner to resign.

    On Saturday, over 800 people took to the streets protesting what they call the use of excessive force and the suppression of free speech by police.

    [Hong Kong Student]:
    “If we don’t come out and fight for our freedom, Hong Kong will turn into China, without any kind of freedom of speech.”

    Hong Kong, a former British colony, was handed over to the Chinese regime in 1997. The region enjoys greater freedoms than the Mainland, particularly freedom of the press. Yet many citizens think Hong Kong is becoming more and more like the Chinese regime.

    [Tsang Gin-Fung, Chairman of Young Civics]:
    “This all means that Hong Kong is becoming more and more ‘red,’ where the words of those who hold the power become the law.”

    [...]

    [Hung Hiu-Haan, Anti-Violence Movement Spokesperson]:
    “This time we are telling the government, if Andy Tsang doesn’t step down, or the police system is not reformed, we will not stop and will continue our movement.”

    Hong Kong’s Chief Secretary, Henry Tang, has dismissed the claims of suppression of freedom as “complete rubbish.”