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    Children Spray Water to Cool Down Japan's High Heat

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    Children gather to throw water on the scorching streets of Tokyo, as Japan faces record breaking heat. Uchimizu, or water splashing, is a traditional way of cooling down in Japan.

    With Japan facing record heat and Tokyo alone seeing the mercury reach 95 degrees Fahrenheit on Wednesday, some grabbed their buckets and ladles to splash around and cool down at the same time.

    The traditional manner of throwing water on hot asphalt is called "Uchimizu."

    It's used by many as an energy saving method of cooling down.

    For parents, the event was a way to let their children enjoy the experience, because normally, tight housing in Tokyo prevents them from throwing water out their front door.

    [Michiko Asano, Housewife]:
    "It's a good experience for children because they may never have had a chance to do 'Uchimizu' especially those who've grown up in apartments."

    The event organizers hope that Uchimizu will show people they can cool down without using electricity.

    This is significant, given the current power shortages in Japan, due to the March disasters and subsequent shutdown of nuclear power plants.

    [Ryuichi Shinozaki, Event Organizer, Citizen Group Ecozzeria]:
    "We also received a number of requests from companies that want to participate in today's event as they seek ways to save energy and try to do whatever they can easily do amid the nation-wide energy-saving efforts."

    Nuclear power supplied about 30 percent of electricity before the March disaster.

    The reactors that were stopped has been prevented from starting up again due to mistrust from the public.

    That's 39 out of Japan's 54 reactors. This is causing nationwide power shortages.