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    Chinese Regime Launches 2-Month Crackdown in Xinjiang

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    NTDTelevision

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    In the Xinjiang region, Chinese police forces are once again clamping down tough on any resurgence of ethnic violence. The move comes after the unrest in Hotan and Kashgar that killed at least three dozen people.

    The Chinese regime started another hard-line security crackdown on ethnic violence in the western region of Xinjiang on August 11th.

    On Tuesday, local authorities said the "strike-hard" operation would run until October 15th. It involves ID checks, street searches of people and vehicles, and 24-hour police patrols in high-risk areas.

    Local authorities stated on their website that police forces are clamping down on suspicious activities and will deal harshly with suspects—through quick trials and tougher sentencing.

    The latest crackdown in the region came after three separate spurts of violence in the cities of Hotan and Kashgar—killing at least three-dozen people.

    Chinese authorities blame Uighur Muslim separatists for the violence, alleging that the Uighur attackers are terrorists who had training in Pakistan.

    In contrast, the World Uyghur Congress spokesperson, Alim Seytoff, has informed NTD that the Chinese regime is trying to make the global community believe that Uighur Muslims are terrorists.

    According to Seytoff, their aim is to, "Justify the follow-up [of] heavy-handed repression of and wholesale attack on the peaceful Uighur people, and [to] deflect international concern and criticism of the terrible human rights situation in East Turkestan."

    The violence broke out despite stronger security presence in the region since the Urumqi ethnic riot in 2009 that killed nearly 200 people.

    Seytoff explained to NTD it happened because the Uighur Muslims have been desperate, living under the Chinese regime's brutal rule—with many losing all hope of resolving injustice through peaceful means.