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    The Acropolis Attracts Full Moon Festival Goers

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    Thousands flock to the Acropolis hill for the the August moon festival to enjoy a concert, ancient sites, and a free museum visit. For a little while, at least, the gloom of a depression and austerity cuts were held at bay.

    Every year the Greek capital Athens holds a full moon festival in August, under the Acropolis, when it is said to be at its biggest and brightest.

    [...]

    This did not deter the thousands of Greeks and tourists who flocked to the area below where they could wander around the small Herodes Atticus Odeon, under the Parthenon, and the moon.

    There was also a concert with Greek musicians and singers who serenaded about the moon.

    The Greeks in the audience were particularly wooed by internationally renowned composer and musician Mimis Plessas who played the piano.

    Free admission helped to quickly fill the Acropolis museum.

    [Nadia Ghrab, French Tourist]:
    "What I find really interesting is it looks like a very popular festival. There are families, there are old people, there are children. Its a real party in all its splendour and I find that really nice."

    [Lars Keimmesland, Norwegian Tourist]:
    "It's very good to bring people together with a concert and its always nice with a concert, it connects people in a good way," said Norwegian tourist.

    Greece is seeing more toursits this year, but the country is reeling from severe austerity cuts which have led to several violent protests in front of the parliament.

    Figures published this week showed unemployment rose to a new record high of 16.6. percent.

    This comes from austerity measures which have plunged the economy into a deep recession.

    Tourists said they fully supported the Greek people during the recession.

    [...]

    Seventy-five archeological sites and monuments across the country were kept open on full moon night.