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    Chinese Activists Taken on Unexplained "Forced Outings"

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    NTDTelevision

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    Chinese authorities are still keeping dissidents under a heavy watch, perhaps still fearing an uprising against the regime... similar to what happened in Egypt six months ago. So earlier this month, state security officials took about a dozen rights activists from Guizhou Province on a (quote on quote) "forced outing." Activists say these unexplained trips are common, especially during periods the Chinese regime considers "sensitive."

    Rights advocates in China's Guizhou Province say authorities continue to keep them under surveillance—even forcing them to leave town for unspecified reasons.

    On July 16th, a grassroots group, the Guizhou Human Rights Research Committee, met at a local park. The next day, state security personnel took about a dozen of them away on a so-called "trip."

    [...]

    Rights activist Chen Xi says this time authorities kept them away for five days without any explanation for the forced outing.

    [Chen Xi, Guizhou Rights Activist]:
    "We're guessing that it's because of an official human rights forum that was taking place. Also there was a nationwide eco-forum in the capital Guiyang. Officials including Jia Qinglin (Chairman of the National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference) were there. Police said they were just following orders, the Communist Party's orders."

    Activist Li Renke says forced outings like these are common practice.

    [...]

    The Chinese regime spends tens of billions of yuan on 'wei-wen'—that is, stability maintenance each year. It includes constant monitoring of dissidents and individuals the regime considers a potential threat to its rule. Since February this year, the Chinese regime intensified its crackdown, after activists called for an Egyptian-style Jasmine uprising.