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    Acoustic Blues Guitar - My Baby's Gone - Brownie McGhee

    Jim Bruce - Bluesman

    par Jim Bruce - Bluesman

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    Guitar lessons available on http://play-blues-guitar.eu/lessons

    Acoustic Blues Travellers , Ken Mayall (harmonica) and Jim Bruce (guitar)play 'My Baby's Gone'.

    Walter Brown McGhee matured in Kingsport, Tennessee. He contracted polio at the age of 4, which left him with a severe limp and lots of time far from school to practice the guitar chords that he 'd gained from his daddy, Duff McGhee. Brownie's more youthful bro, Granville McGhee, was likewise a gifted guitar player who later on struck huge with the romping "Drinkin' Wine Spo-Dee-O-Dee"; he made his label, "Stick," by pressing his maimed brother or sister around in a little cart moved by a stick.
    A 1937 operation sponsored by the March of Dimes brought back many of McGhee's movement. His jaunts brought him into contact with washboard player George "Oh Red" (or "Bull City Red") Washington in 1940, who in turn presented McGhee to skill scout J.B. Long.

    Towards completion, they chose not to share a phase with one another (Terry would have fun with another guitar player, then McGhee would do a solo), not to mention interact. Among McGhee's last performance looks came at the 1995 Chicago Blues Festival; his voice was a little less robust than typical, however no less moving, and his abundant, full-bodied acoustic guitar work cut through the cool night air with alacrity. His like will not pass by doing this once again.

    The wheels lastly came off the collaboration of McGhee and Terry throughout the mid-'70s.

    Long's primary blues artist, Blind Boy Fuller, passed away in 1941, speeding up Okeh issuance of a few of McGhee's early efforts under the sobriquet of Blind Boy Fuller No. 2. McGhee cut a moving homage tune, "Death of Blind Boy Fuller," soon later. McGhee's 3rd marathon session for OKeh in 1941 paired him for the very first time on shellac with whooping harpist Terry for "Workingman's Blues."

    The set transplanted in New York in 1942. They rapidly got gotten in touch with the city's growing folk music circuit, dealing with Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, and Leadbelly. After completion of World War II, McGhee started to tape most prolifically, both with and without Terry, for a myriad of R&B labels: Savoy (where he cut "Robbie Doby Boogie" in 1948 and "New Baseball Boogie" the next year), Alert, London, Derby, Sittin' in With, and its Jax subsidiary in 1952, Jackson, Bobby Robinson's Red Robin logo design (1953), Dot, and Harlem, prior to crossing over to the folk audience throughout the late '50s with Terry at his side.

    Brownie McGhee's death in 1996 was a massive loss in the blues field. Together, McGhee and Terry worked for years in an acoustic folk-blues bag, singing ancient ditties like "John Henry" and "Pick a Bale of Cotton" for pleased audiences worldwide.

    After the end of World War II, McGhee started to tape most prolifically, both with and without Terry, for a myriad of R&B labels: Savoy (where he cut "Robbie Doby Boogie" in 1948 and "New Baseball Boogie" the next year), Alert, London, Derby, Sittin' in With, and its Jax subsidiary in 1952, Jackson, Bobby Robinson's Red Robin logo design (1953), Dot, and Harlem, prior to crossing over to the folk audience throughout the late '50s with Terry at his side.

    McGhee didn't restrict his skills to performance settings. The wheels lastly came off the collaboration of McGhee and Terry throughout the mid-'70s.

    Towards the end, they chose not to share a phase with one another (Terry would play with another guitar player, then McGhee would do a solo), let alone interact.

    Among McGhee's last dates for Savoy in 1958 produced the incredibly modern "Living with the Blues," with Roy Gaines and Carl Lynch blasting away on lead guitars and a sound light years gotten rid of from the staid folk world.
    McGhee and Terry were amongst the very first blues artists to explore Europe throughout the '50s, and they ventured overseas frequently after that. Their huge selection of late-'50s and early-'60s albums for Folkways, Choice, World Pacific, Bluesville, and Fantasy provided the duo in acoustic folk features just, their Piedmont-style musical interaction a continuous (if slowly more foreseeable) pleasure.

    Together, McGhee and Terry worked for years in an acoustic folk-blues bag, singing ancient ditties like "John Henry" and "Pick a Bale of Cotton" for pleased audiences worldwide. McGhee's 3rd marathon session for OKeh in 1941 paired him for the very first time on shellac with whooping harpist Terry for "Workingman's Blues."