H.P. Lovecraft ® Collection Vol 2: Dreams of Cthulhu


by Microcinema

  • About
  • Export
  • Add to
The cult of the Sleeping God is on the rise. Mr. Moon is dealing with the current emergency using methods imitated by the Night Scholars (methods that he does not fully understand). When a Dreamer on a South London housing estate performs the ritual sacrifice of her two young children, Mr. Moon closes down the subsequent police investigation and has the Dreamer quickly interned at a secret location. Moon and his silent assistants deliver a grotesque sculpture found at the scene of the crime to Kenneth Reece Warren, a man who already knows too much. Warren was a psychiatrist and a former Night Scholar who now owns The Outsider Art Gallery in Hoxton. Moon wants to discover more about the occult Sigil that can be used to restrict the influence of the Sleeping God on the Dreamers. He uses an experimental truth drug on Warren and proceeds to interrogate him about his experiences during the Falklands war and his knowledge of the Sigil. Warren tells a disturbing tale: he was working for the Ministry of Defense on a covert mission to study the liberation forces in action, part of a large scale psychological profile of the modern British fighting man. Warren’s unit, led by Colonel Shaw, were instructed to establish a temporary command and control centre in an abandoned army hide on the south side of the islands. They dispatched a five-man team, Delta Three, to an isolated farmhouse in search of an Argentine patrol. However, the unit members returned traumatized by what they experienced there. When Warren’s psychiatric skills were required his mission was compromised and Colonel Shaw decided to lead a night march to secure Cairnstone Farm. Inside the walls of the dilapidated farmhouse, Warren encountered Mr. Wilson, who was possessed by a soul of some entity from Earth’s distant past. Wilson reveals to Warren the origin of the Sleeping God and gives him a shield against its influences – the Sigil. Moon is shaken by the chilling implications of Warren’s narrative. However it strengthens his ...