'Lindow Man' Still A Significant Archaeological Discovery 30 Years Later

Geo Beats
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Professors at the University of Manchester are celebrating the 30th anniversary of the discovery of Lindow Man, a well-preserved human body from the moss bogs in Wilmslow, Britain. A peat cutter found the human remains on August 1st 1984, and the groundbreaking discovery is still hailed as one of the most important archaeological discoveries of the 1980s.

Professors at the University of Manchester are celebrating the 30th anniversary of the discovery of Lindow Man, a well-preserved human body from the moss bogs in Wilmslow, Britain.

A peat cutter found the human remains on August 1st 1984, and the groundbreaking discovery is still hailed as one of the most important archaeological discoveries of the 1980s.

Working with the group Transition Wilmslow, three university professors organized an event called the Lindow Moss Dawn Walk to encourage awareness of the historic, archaeological, and ecological significance of the area.

Radiocarbon dating shows that he died violently at some point during the 1st century AD.

Professor Anthony Jones from the University of Manchester's Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences is quoted as saying: "We know he was killed by blows to the head, garrotting, swallowing mistletoe and then drowning in the waters of the peat bog. But we don't know for certain why he was killed or whether he was willing."

There have been several exhibitions of the Lindow Man at the Manchester Museum, and the remains are currently being housed at the British Museum.

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