PBS FRONTLINE: GHOSTS OF RWANDA 3 OF 8

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PBS FRONTLINE: GHOSTS OF RWANDA PART 3 OF 8

While "Ghosts of Rwanda" investigates the relationship between Africa and the West, the film also details the personal experiences of the few foreigners who stayed in Rwanda and had an enormous impact like Philippe Gaillard of the Red Cross. Gaillard was the only representative of a major aid organization to remain in Rwanda throughout the genocide.

Although his organization has a tradition of quiet-spoken neutrality, Galliard decided Rwanda was different, and he went public with his estimate of how many people had been killed in a matter of two weeks: 100,000.

"In such circumstances, if you don't at least speak out clearly, you are participating [in] the genocide. If you just shut up when you see what you see … -- morally, ethically you cannot shut up. It's a responsibility to talk, to speak out."

The commander of the U.N. peacekeeping force in Rwanda, Gen. Romeo Dallaire says he remains haunted by his inability to stop the killing. "Rwanda will never leave me: it's in the pores of my body. …We saw lots of them dying, and lots of those eyes still haunt me -- angry eyes, innocent eyes. They're looking at me with my blue beret, and they're saying, `What in the hell happened?'"

"Ghost of Rwanda" concludes by examining the aftermath of the genocide, the lessons learned -- and not learned -- by the international community, and by questioning whether the phrase "never again" has more meaning today than it did ten years ago.

"'Never again' was said after the Nazis. It was said after the killing fields of Cambodia. It was said after Rwanda," says Michael Sheehan, a former staff member of the National Security Council and an aide to Ambassador Madeleine Albright at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations in 1994.

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By Fahima102 4 years ago