Scientists Discover How Egyptian Pyramid Workers Moved Massive Stones

Geo Beats

by Geo Beats

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Researchers from the FOM Foundation working with the University of Amsterdam may have solved one of the mysteries surrounding how ancient Egyptians were able to build the pyramids without modern technology and equipment. According to the results of the study, ancient pyramid builders might have hauled huge, heavy stones over the desert sand by making the sand wet to reduce friction.

Researchers from the FOM Foundation working with the University of Amsterdam may have solved one of the mysteries surrounding how ancient Egyptians were able to build the pyramids without modern technology and equipment.

According to the results of the study, ancient pyramid builders might have hauled huge, heavy stones over the desert sand by making the sand wet to reduce friction.

Adding water to sand creates capillary bridges that hold the sand grains together, making them more compact.

The researchers tested their theory by pulling a lab version of a sled over sand to measure the necessary pulling force and stiffness of the sand.

Using just the right amount of water to make the sand damp, meant that only half the number of workers would have been required to move the stones, because when the sand is wet, around half of the force is necessary to pull the weight.

On a wall in an Egyptian tomb discovered during the Victorian Era, there is a depiction of how ancient workers moved the huge stones across great distances using manpower and large sleds.

Also shown in the ancient picture is a person standing on the front of the sled pouring water onto the sand.