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    Indonesian Religious Leaders Announce Fatwa Against Hunting Endangered Species

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    Geo Beats

    by Geo Beats

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    For the first time in history, religious leaders in the country of Indonesia have officially banned the hunting of endangered species under Islamic law. A group of Muslim scholars known as the Ulema council has announced their opposition to the killing of endangered species in what is called a fatwa or religious law.

    For the first time in history, religious leaders in the country of Indonesia have officially banned the hunting of endangered species under Islamic law.

    A group of Muslim scholars known as the Ulema council has announced their opposition to the killing of endangered species in what is called a fatwa or religious law.

    The secretary of the council’s commission on fatwas is quoted as saying: “All activities resulting in wildlife extinction without justifiable religious grounds or legal provisions are haram, forbidden. These include illegal hunting and trading of endangered animals.”

    The new religious law technically has no bearing on government, but because a large percentage of the Indonesian population is Muslim, the effects might have a significantly positive impact on the preservation of endangered species.

    Deforestation is reportedly a major problem in Indonesia, and this has had a devastating impact on the rare species that live there like the Sumatran tiger, orangutan, and the Sumatran elephant which is poached for its ivory tusks.

    The World Wildlife Fund, or WWF has publicly announced their support of the fatwa.