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    Fisherman Discovers Rare Conjoined Whale Twins

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    Geo Beats

    by Geo Beats

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    A rare pair of conjoined gray whale twins was found by a fisherman in the Ojo de Liebre lagoon, located in Mexico near the Baja, California peninsula.

    Conjoined twins aren't just limited to the human realm.

    A rare find of conjoined gray whale twins was found by fishermen in the Ojo de Liebre lagoon, located in Mexico near the Baja, California peninsula.

    The duo was joined at the waist, and each had a head and a tail.

    The pair was deceased when discovered, which given their overall odds of survival wasn’t considered surprising.

    According to one expert, the Siamese twin whales hadn’t made it to full term, but even if they had its unlikely they would have thrived.

    Among the many challenges that would have faced them is being able to swim to the water’s surface to get air, as the placement of blowholes in conjoined twins is seldom conducive to the task.

    What happened to their mother remains unclear. As of yet, she hasn’t been spotted among the large number of whales involved in the recent migration to the area.

    What scientists are confident about is that neither the twin whale’s creation nor their fate was related in any way to radiation resulting from the Fukushima nuclear plant disaster.

    Multiple tests on marine mammals stranded in California since have shown no evidence of having been contaminated.