What Does It Sound Like 6 Miles Under the Earth's Surface

Geo Beats
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Scientists in southern Germany began trying to drill the deepest hole on Earth a couple of decades ago. The site remains accessible to scientists, so a Dutch artist named Lotte Geeven, working with researchers at the German Research Center for Geosciences and a sound engineer, recorded natural sounds from the hole six miles below the surface of the Earth.

Scientists in southern Germany began trying to drill the deepest hole on Earth a couple of decades ago.

Funding for the project ran out after a few years,but not before researchers had collected valuable new geological information from a hole reaching about six miles down.

The site remains accessible to scientists, so a Dutch artist named Lotte Geeven, working with a sound engineer, along with researchers at the German Research Center for Geosciences, recorded the earth’s echoes from the depths of the hole.

At that depth, the earth seems to rumble and crackle.

A recording of the sounds was released for the public as a streaming internet video.

Although it is still unclear what is making these sounds, the drill site is close to where two former land masses merged to form the super continent of Pangaea, so there is reportedly a lot of seismic activity in this area.

Known as the KTB Borehole, it reaches nearly 30 thousand feet underground, and is the deepest accessible hole on the planet.

But there is a hole in the Arctic Circle in Russia called the Kola Superdeep Borehole that reaches almost 8 miles down, but has been abandoned and is closed for research.

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