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    Young Bonobos Console Other Upset Peers

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    Geo Beats

    by Geo Beats

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    A new study on the behavior of bonobo apes shows another way they are similar to humans in social interactions.

    A new study on the behavior of bonobo apes shows another way they are similar to humans in social interactions.
    Researchers from Emory University working with data from the Lola ya Bonobo Sanctuary in Kinshasa focused on the behavior of young bonobos, some of which had been orphaned by the effects of illegal bushmeat hunting in the jungles of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    The reactions of the young apes were observed in the aftermath of a disturbing fight.

    Bonobos in the study that had been raised by their mothers were reportedly more socially well adjusted than the orphans, offering consolation to those that were upset.
    One of the researchers, Frans de Waal wrote: “It is almost as if one first needs to have one’s own emotional house in order before one is ready to visit the emotional house of another. This is true for children, and apparently also for bonobos.”

    Those bonobos were also more likely to try to help another upset ape, and they were able to get over their own feelings of stress more quickly.

    The type of behavior the bonobos display when they are trying to comfort one of their upset peers is gently touching, embracing, and kissing them, similar to human expression.