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    Research Shows Mars Might Have Been Torn Up by Supervolcanoes

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    Geo Beats

    by Geo Beats

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    Giant craters on the surface of the planet Mars might have been caused by the eruption of supervolcanoes rather than the impact of meteors, according to recent research from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center.

    Giant craters on the surface of the planet Mars might have been caused by the eruption of supervolcanoes rather than the impact of meteors, according to recent research from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center.
    By studying the crater formations called calderas in the northern hemisphere of Mars, scientists have concluded that supervolcanoes likely contributed to the atmospheric and surface landscapes of our neighboring red planet.

    NASA scientist Joe Michalski who worked on the study said: “If future work shows that supervolcanoes were present more widely on ancient Mars, it would completely change estimates of how the atmosphere formed from volcanic gases, how sediments formed from volcanic ash and how habitable the surface might have been.”

    Supervolcanoes are defined as eruptions that put out over 1 thousand cubic kilometers of rocks and ashes.

    Rather than forming mountains from the eruption, supervolcanoes leave their mark on the surrounding landscape in the form of vents and fissures in the surface along with the bowl shaped caldera.

    Yellowstone National Park in the United States is located on top of a supervolcano, one of several that have erupted on Earth in the ancient past.