Historical pottery of Tughlaq Period from Firoz Shah Kotla, Delhi

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Our viewer Steve Gaskin tells us that these are "highly important Yuan dynasty blue and white porcelain, and showing only two doesn't highlight that the collection these are from is the largest in the world." Thanks, Steve!

Dish, China Clay (Porcelain) of Tughlaq Period from Firoz Shah Kotla, Delhi

Bowl, China Clay (Porcelain) also of Tughlaq Period from Firoz Shah Kotla, Delhi

Lots, Red ware of Sultanate Period from Lalkot, Delhi

Bowl, China Clay (Caledon) of Tughlaq Period from Firoz Shah Kotla, Delhi

Flask, Glass of Medieval Period from Pauni, Maharashtra

Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) presented an exhibition, Rediscovering India 1961-2011, showcasing its achievements through excavations, popular monuments and successful conservation projects carried out from 1961 till 2011. A similar exhibition was held in Delhi in 1961 as the department completed 100 years of work. More than 3600 Indian heritage monuments and archaeological sites are under the management of ASI.

There were 307 objects on display including some retrieved antiquities and four fibre glass replicas. The antiquities have been selected from all the major periodic divisions of Indian history (prehistory to modern history) and from different regions of the country. In addition there will be some photographs, map, illustrations and explanatory charts and write-ups.

The earliest artifacts in the exhibition are the prehistoric stone tools used by primitive man when he was a hunter/food gatherer. The pottery which first appeared during Neolithic period is also on display. A major attraction is the objects belonging to the Harappan culture which include the inscribed seals, beads, pottery, terracotta figurines, etc. The furrow marks which are the first evidence of agriculture at Kalibangan and the oldest signboard at Dholavira, both discovered through excavations and belonging to Harappan period are photographically displayed. The objects from Megalithic culture are interesting as they were put in the burials under life after death concept. The bronzes from Sirpur (M.P.) belonging to 7th-8th century with Brahmanical and Buddhist affiliation are landmark finds of early medieval period witnessing remarkable metallurgical skills of contemporary artist. The antiquities from early, medieval and modern periods of history are represented by a variety of objects made in terracotta, stone, metal and household utility items, ornaments, weapons, beads, coins, inscriptions, pottery, etc. An outstanding exhibit is the fibre glass replica of a relief panel from Kanaganahalli near Sannati in Karnataka depicting King Asoka with his consort which is the first sculpture of the legendary Mauryan emperor.

Source: http://pib.nic.in/newsite/erelease.aspx?relid=91183

This footage is part of the professionally-shot broadcast stock footage archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd., the largest collection of HD imagery from South Asia. The Wilderness Films India collection comprises of tens of thousands of hours of high quality broadcast imagery, mostly shot on HDCAM 1080i High Definition, HDV and XDCAM. Write to us for licensing this footage on a broadcast format, for use in your production! We are happy to be commissioned to film for you or else provide you with broadcast crewing and production solutions across South Asia. We pride ourselves in bringing the best of India and South Asia to the world... Reach us at wfi @ vsnl.com and admin@wildfilmsindia.com.

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